Tuesday 15

Join the BigPicnic Final Festival in Madrid!

Posted by Helen Miller, BigPicnic Project Co-ordinator on 15 Jan 2019

 

BigPicnic: Big Questions – engaging the public with Responsible Research and Innovation on Food Security

Final Festival event – 27th February 2019, Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid, Spain.

We invite you to join us for the BigPicnic Final Festival - the finale to the BigPicnic project, celebrating the achievements of our Partners and audiences.

BigPicnic is a Horizon2020 project that brings together the public, scientists, policy-makers and industry to help tackle the global challenge of food security. Botanic gardens, have been co-creating exhibitions and participatory events with people from all walks of life, to generate dialogue and build greater understanding of food security. Our collaborative approach gives a voice to adults and young people, communicating their views to policy-makers, sharing ideas, encouraging debate on the future of our food and achieving Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI).

...

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Tuesday 15

Join the BigPicnic Final Festival in Madrid!

Posted by Helen Miller, BigPicnic Project Co-ordinator on 15 Jan 2019

 

BigPicnic: Big Questions – engaging the public with Responsible Research and Innovation on Food Security

Final Festival event – 27th February 2019, Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid, Spain.

We invite you to join us for the BigPicnic Final Festival - the finale to the BigPicnic project, celebrating the achievements of our Partners and audiences.

BigPicnic is a Horizon2020 project that brings together the public, scientists, policy-makers and industry to help tackle the global challenge of food security. Botanic gardens, have been co-creating exhibitions and participatory events with people from all walks of life, to generate dialogue and build greater understanding of food security. Our collaborative approach gives a voice to adults and young people, communicating their...

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Friday 23

Nano in cosmetics: an industry case of RRI implementation

Posted by Andrea Porcari - PRISMA project on 23 Nov 2018

This post by Andrea Porcari was originally published at the RRI - PRISMA Blog (8 October 2018)

 

The application of nanomaterials in cosmetics has always been a matter of debate, raising some fundamental questions: what is the matter with using nano? Is there a real added value for people? Is it safe?  What are the uncertainties for human health?

As a typical unnecessary good, consumer acceptance of a cosmetic product is strongly affected by both functional and non-functional features of the product. Nanomaterials could be used to improve the efficacy of the product, for example ensuring filtering of UV radiation or better shelf-life, as well as to enhance aesthetic properties, as for example the colour of a make-up.

Though consumers might welcome new features given by the use of nanotechnologies, this conflicts with risk perception of new technologies, which is always higher for products getting in close contact with the human body such as cosmetics.

Cosmetics are as well the first sector where specific requirements for nanomaterials have been introduced in regulation (Reg CE 1223/09), forcing industry to make a specific safety assessment and declare the use of nanosubstances in the product (labelling).

A perfect case for RRI, with conflicting stakeholder positions, not straightforward/ambiguous social benefits, and regulatory challenges has to be faced.

One of the RRI industrial pilots (Nanocube project) conducted within the Prisma project is addressing a very interesting case: the use of nanomaterials is combined with the development of a cosmetic product based on natural and organic ingredients.

...

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Tuesday 18

Join the SMART-map Final Meeting in Brussels!

Posted by RRI Tools on 18 Sep 2018

The final meeting of the SMART-map project will take place on the 1st of October 2018 at Hotel NH Brussels Bloom in Brussels, Belgium.

The event - a full day conference followed by a cocktail reception - aims to actively engage participants in discussing the project results, discover inspiring examples on how to implement responsible innovation in industrial realms, and contribute to a lively debate on the future of responsible research and innovation (RRI). Representatives from companies in precision medicine, 3D printing and synthetic biology will come together with civil society organisations and policy makers, as well as industry associations, funders, think- tanks and strategic consultants, to share inspiring experiences. You can find more information about the programme of the event here 

...

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Thursday 26

RRI in industry: finding the right tools for the job

Posted by Dr. Pim Klaassen - Prisma project on 26 Jul 2018

 

There can be no doubt about it: Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) has taken off as directive force in the fields of Research & Innovation (R&I) policy and governance. For a couple of years now, under the name of RRI, researchers, innovative businesses, policy makers, CSOs, educators and others have been making investments towards a R&I system that puts societal needs and desires at its center, that is outward- and forward-looking, and that aims to contribute ethically sound solutions for a sustainable future. Funding is available for those promoting and further developing RRI, prizes have been awarded for those successfully putting it into practice, and tools have been collected together to facilitate embracing any of its many aspects.

Despite all the good work, however, RRI’s width and conceptual complexity might still pose a threat to its success. Taking a structured approach to making one’s research and innovation efforts conform to societal needs, ethically sound and sustainable for one’s institution as well as the wider society and planet, can be quite a task. Furthermore, people might be skeptical of RRI’s potential for improving their research and innovation, doubting that they could really benefit from putting it to use. Especially in the sphere of industrial innovation, where time is money and resources are scarce, there is reason to believe that the hurdles between hearing about RRI and doing RRI are too many and too high. In the PRISMA project, we want to change that. 

...

See More
Tuesday 15

Join the BigPicnic Final Festival in Madrid!

Posted by Helen Miller, BigPicnic Project Co-ordinator on 15 Jan 2019

 

BigPicnic: Big Questions – engaging the public with Responsible Research and Innovation on Food Security

Final Festival event – 27th February 2019, Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid, Spain.

We invite you to join us for the BigPicnic Final Festival - the finale to the BigPicnic project, celebrating the achievements of our Partners and audiences.

BigPicnic is a Horizon2020 project that brings together the public, scientists, policy-makers and industry to help tackle the global challenge of food security. Botanic gardens, have been co-creating exhibitions and participatory events with people from all walks of life, to generate dialogue and build greater understanding of food security. Our collaborative approach gives a voice to adults and young people, communicating their views to policy-makers, sharing ideas, encouraging debate on the future of our food and achieving Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI).

...

See More
Friday 23

Nano in cosmetics: an industry case of RRI implementation

Posted by Andrea Porcari - PRISMA project on 23 Nov 2018

This post by Andrea Porcari was originally published at the RRI - PRISMA Blog (8 October 2018)

 

The application of nanomaterials in cosmetics has always been a matter of debate, raising some fundamental questions: what is the matter with using nano? Is there a real added value for people? Is it safe?  What are the uncertainties for human health?

As a typical unnecessary good, consumer acceptance of a cosmetic product is strongly affected by both functional and non-functional features of the product. Nanomaterials could be used to improve the efficacy of the product, for example ensuring filtering of UV radiation or better shelf-life, as well as to enhance aesthetic properties, as for example the colour of a make-up.

Though consumers might welcome new features given by the use of nanotechnologies, this conflicts with risk perception of new technologies, which is always higher for products getting in close contact with the human body such as cosmetics.

Cosmetics are as well the first sector where specific requirements for nanomaterials have been introduced in regulation (Reg CE 1223/09), forcing industry to make a specific safety assessment and declare the use of nanosubstances in the product (labelling).

A perfect case for RRI, with conflicting stakeholder positions, not straightforward/ambiguous social benefits, and regulatory challenges has to be faced.

One of the RRI industrial pilots (Nanocube project) conducted within the Prisma project is addressing a very interesting case: the use of nanomaterials is combined with the development of a cosmetic product based on natural and organic ingredients.

...

See More
Tuesday 18

Join the SMART-map Final Meeting in Brussels!

Posted by RRI Tools on 18 Sep 2018

The final meeting of the SMART-map project will take place on the 1st of October 2018 at Hotel NH Brussels Bloom in Brussels, Belgium.

The event - a full day conference followed by a cocktail reception - aims to actively engage participants in discussing the project results, discover inspiring examples on how to implement responsible innovation in industrial realms, and contribute to a lively debate on the future of responsible research and innovation (RRI). Representatives from companies in precision medicine, 3D printing and synthetic biology will come together with civil society organisations and policy makers, as well as industry associations, funders, think- tanks and strategic consultants, to share inspiring experiences. You can find more information about the programme of the event here 

...

See More
Thursday 26

RRI in industry: finding the right tools for the job

Posted by Dr. Pim Klaassen - Prisma project on 26 Jul 2018

 

There can be no doubt about it: Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) has taken off as directive force in the fields of Research & Innovation (R&I) policy and governance. For a couple of years now, under the name of RRI, researchers, innovative businesses, policy makers, CSOs, educators and others have been making investments towards a R&I system that puts societal needs and desires at its center, that is outward- and forward-looking, and that aims to contribute ethically sound solutions for a sustainable future. Funding is available for those promoting and further developing RRI, prizes have been awarded for those successfully putting it into practice, and tools have been collected together to facilitate embracing any of its many aspects.

Despite all the good work, however, RRI’s width and conceptual complexity might still pose a threat to its success. Taking a structured approach to making one’s research and innovation efforts conform to societal needs, ethically sound and sustainable for one’s institution as well as the wider society and planet, can be quite a task. Furthermore, people might be skeptical of RRI’s potential for improving their research and innovation, doubting that they could really benefit from putting it to use. Especially in the sphere of industrial innovation, where time is money and resources are scarce, there is reason to believe that the hurdles between hearing about RRI and doing RRI are too many and too high. In the PRISMA project, we want to change that. 

...

See More
Friday 06

Want to know more about the HEIRRI training programmes and formative materials?

Posted by RRI Tools on 06 Jul 2018

Ten new training programmes on Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) were presented in April at the HEIRRI second conference.

Packaged in an informative and educational format, the HEIRRI training programmes present various different sides of the RRI concept and are based on innovative and participative methodologies, following a “Problem-based learning” approach. They are designed for different educational levels: bachelor’s, master’s, PhD, MOOC, Summer schools, train-the-trainer, secondary school teachers. Presented in multimedia formats, they can be found online and in open access in the RRI Tools platform

Studying Responsibility: A Module-Based Integration of RRI into Bachekor's Programmes

BACHELOR / Between 20H and 50H

This training programme gives an introduction to different concepts of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), and related the ideas, rationales, and aims. In the modules of this programme, different cases are presented, discussed, and engaged with through different problem-based learning activities. Additionally, pratical approaches on how to address RRI will be provided.

...

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