Monday 07

Showcase videos on successful RRI in the business sector

Posted by André Martinuzzi, coordinator of the LIV_IN project on 07 Feb 2022

Based on more than three years of experience the EU funded project LIVING INNOVATION presents major outcomes in 9 showcase videos. 

Many of them will be the starting point of future exchange and networking, as the project will continue to organize online dialogues and virtual innovation corners (for upcoming events please visit our news section)

 

This video presents a new and business-oriented narrative on Responsible Innovation based on three elements: 

  • Managing Impacts of innovation means to innovate with positive impact and accept responsibility beyond markets. It increases a company’s value and reduces the risks of sunken costs and societal follow up costs.
  • Co-creating Innovation refers to a company’s responsibility to put societal needs in the center of innovation processes and to innovate in a truly inclusive manner. It contributes to more and better fitting ideas and tackles grand societal challenges.
  • A systemic perspective is a company’s responsibility for future-oriented solutions and drives innovation by understanding interrelationships. It allows individual companies to become an industry game-changer and increases societal resilience and sustainability at the same time.

These three elements link the societal benefits of RRI with concrete business cases and highlight the deriving opportunities for companies. More details can be found in the LIV_IN Policy Brief “A New Narrative For Responsible Innovation

 

Co-creation is a frequently used term in EU policies and programmes. It turns people into partners and takes the diversity of stakeholder interests into account. As a result, implementation is often done faster and with fewer conflicts.

In this video we present a toolkit for co-creation in corporate innovation processes. It addresses aspects of strategic planning, quality criteria, methods and practical considerations of effective and successful co-creation processes.

You can download the co-creation toolbox here 

 

Design Thinking is a well-established tool for innovation managers, which provides them with a better understanding of user needs and allows faster prototyping of results.

In the LIVING INNOVATION project we integrated key aspects of responsibility and sustainability into design-thinking with a sound scientific basis. We then tested our concept, which we call “Responsible Design Thinking”, in a series of workshops. 

In this video, we briefly introduce the concept and show you how you can apply it. 

 

As part of the LIVING INNOVATION project, we launched a series of webinars to share the diverse experiences, raise awareness of innovative teaching concepts and to encourage teachers to do more than just teach via Zoom and MS Teams. We discovered some truly innovative applications of virtual, augmented and extended reality which have great potential for the future.

In this video we present the advantages of extended reality (XR) in teaching and training and suggest a virtual one-stop shop that documents these benefits and acts as a reference platform for the various applications. It should take stock of already existing solutions, develop innovative applications from early prototypes to market-ready products, and support their dissemination. 

 

Most of the well-established tools are not appropriate when it comes to facilitating a workshop with blind or visually impaired participants. The result is that we tend to exclude blind and visually impaired people from innovation processes.

In this video we show you how you can design your workshop in a truly inclusive manner and what tools are appropriate for blind and visually impaired participants. These tools were developed and tested in a series of workshops organized by the Siemens Accessibility Competence Center. 

For more details, please see our guide “Seven practical points for facilitating workshops with blind and visually impaired people” 

 

How will business travel look like in the future. Will we get back on the planes after the pandemic with all the resulting CO2 emissions, costs and time required? Or will we remain in front of the computer screen and suffer from digital fatigue and reduced creativity? Could holographic telepresence be a third and better way of conducting business meetings? 

In this video we present a concept of how holographic telepresence could replace business travel which we developed in the LIVING INNOVATION project.  Imagine being able to rent a Holobox for a short time in a hotel, restaurant, petrol station, post office, in an airport or railway station, or a hospital or care facility. You could meet business partners or even friends and relatives holographically. 

Such a holographic network would not only avoid business trips, but we could also use it privately, to meet friends, relatives and people in hospitals and nursing homes, who would then be less lonely. This is a responsible, sustainable and systemic innovation that we would really like to see in reality.

 

Using public transport can be difficult for some, especially for people with reduced mobility. While for people with buggies, in wheelchairs or with walking aids, a lot has already been achieved in recent years, the daily challenges faced by blind and visually impaired people have received comparatively little attention so far.

In this video we present a smart mobility app which was developed and implemented by the Siemens Accessibility Competence Center in the course of the LIVING INNOVATION project. In the German town Padderborn 100 buses were equipped with Bluetooth via which they communicate directly with the Padersprinter Kompass App. It informs blind and visually impaired people waiting at the bus stop which bus is approaching and where it is going. When getting on or off the bus, they can request that the bus is lowered and trigger an acoustic signal to find the door. 

The app also supports them during the journey, providing information about which stops are coming next and they can conveniently submit a stop request via the app. 

 

The COVID-19 lockdowns led to a massive shift towards home offices and increased the amount of time we spend sitting even more. As a result, many of us suffer from neck pain and spinal problems. As part of LIVING INNOVATION project, global IT company, ATOS, worked with citizens, experts and scientists to identify the pain points and find a solution for this problem. 

This video presents a smart office chair. Equipped with a variety of sensors, the chair continuously measures the sitting position and posture of the user and provides targeted feedback on how to improve and prevent discomfort. Through feedback and suggestions, unhealthy postures can be corrected, and, over time, a learning curve occurs, meaning that a correct and healthy sitting position becomes natural. Once this improvement has been achieved for one employee, the smart office chair can be passed on to the next employee. Alternatively, the smart office chair can be rented for a certain period, so that the business model is not the sale of the chair, but the health prevention service.

This product is not only interesting to those wishing to prevent back pain, but also for companies in the health and the insurance sector. This product also offers an excellent example of Responsible Innovation as a business opportunity.  ATOS did not focus on one single technology at the beginning of the innovation process, but rather looked at societal trends and listened to the needs of citizens through a series of workshops. ATOS’s aim was to innovate both with the people and for the people.

 

Every year, several hundred thousand Europeans lose an arm, foot or leg due to accidents or circulatory disorders caused by diabetes or smoking. In such a situation, it takes more than anonymous information and written advice. What really helps is not being alone and having a personal exchange with people who have faced and overcome the same challenges. 

In this video we present MOVAO, an online community platform for people with arm and foot prostheses which we developed in the course of the of LIVING INNOVATION project. Ottobock, the world market leader in the development and manufacture of prostheses, organized a series of workshop with and for amputees, carefully analyzed their needs and co-created a platform that enables direct exchange between amputees, while guaranteeing trust, security and privacy.

Ottobock's Movao Platform is interesting from the point of view of responsible innovation as perfectly shows how the focus of an innovation can be expanded from a product to the underlying need, the entire everyday lives of those affected and their difficult situations. Movao aligns with the increasing trend of patient empowerment In the health care sector, and is a good example of the participatory aspect of Responsible Innovation.

 

LIVING INNOVATION is one of the first industry driven initiatives on Responsible Innovation in Europe.

Major companies, leading researchers and civil society organizations joined forces to explore the diverse business opportunities resulting from Responsible Innovation. Together we co-create responsible solutions in the area of smart homes and smart health and co-develop innovation tools that can be applied in other business sectors as well.

LIVING INNOVATION combines a vibrant online community with a series of on-site workshops and online dialogues. By engaging citizens and lead users we strive to co-create the way we will live in 2030 - combining creativity and business acumen, human-centred design and responsibility.

New approaches

LIVING INNOVATION developed a series of new approaches and tools for companies, facilitators and experts. They are not bound to any specific sector, although most of them focus on innovating with, and for, people. Therefore, companies working in B2C might benefit more from our tools than companies only focusing on B2B might. Our tools and approaches can not only be used by innovation managers, innovators, CSR- and sustainability-managers, but also by facilitators and moderators of design thinking processes and stakeholder dialogues.

Co-creation Toolkit: Co-creation is a frequently used term in EU policies and programmes. It turns people into partners and takes the diversity of stakeholder interests into account. As a result, implementation is often faster and has fewer conflicts.

  • Co-creation enables broad participation and goes beyond lead user innovation

  • Co-creation treats all participants equally

  • Co-creation has to consider the needs of the participants

  • Co-creation requires professional process management

  • Co-creation needs resources

Our Co-creation Toolkit provides tools and guidelines for starting and running a responsible innovation process. It is based on experiences from the 19 workshops with over 150 participants in Spain, Germany, Austria, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, which were implemented and evaluated in the course of the LIVING INNOVATION project.

Download Download the Co-creation toolkit for free.

Download a handout on Inclusive Innovation

Responsible Design Thinking integrates key aspects of Responsible Innovation into the well-established scheme of Design Thinking by 

  • a set up phase;

  • explicit focus on societal needs;

  • systems thinking; and

  • consideration of the future impacts of the developed solutions.

We developed our approach of Responsible Design thinking based on a series of expert interviews with Design Thinking professionals and innovation managers. We tested it in several workshops and presented it at the ISPIM 2021 conference (International Society for Professional Innovation Management). If should apply it, please contact us, as we are highly interested in an exchange of experiences.

Watch an introduction into Design Thinking with Bettina Maisch.(Professor for Entrepreneurship at the Munich University of Applied Sciences) 

Watch a Webcast with Alexander Grots.(Chief Creative Officer of EWOR) 

Watch a presentation of Christophe Vetterli.(partner at walkerproject ag) 

Inclusive Innovation means to go beyond lead user and open innovation by including people into innovation processes who are often not considered: children, the elderly, people with special needs and people from poor neighborhoods. If you include them, you receives more, and better fitting, ideas and you can design products that fit the needs of all people. 

Download our guideline for facilitating workshops with blind and visually impaired people

Watch a webinar on how to include people with blindness or low vision

Watch a webinar on how low-income families can co-create innovations

Inspiring insights

LIVING INNOVATION is a central hub to exchange views and experiences on the different aspects of Responsible Innovation. It covers process related aspects (such as inclusive innovation and Responsible Design Thinking), technologies (such as digitalization, smart homes and smart health) and management aspects (such as leadership challenges and business cases).

Responsible Innovation Stories: Over a period of three years, we carried out about 100 video interviews with leading experts and decision-makers from all around the world. They provide valuable insights into the diverse aspects of Responsible Innovation, how it can be implemented, what challenges arise and how it pays off.

→See here or visit our YouTube chanel or search by themes in the news section of our website 

Policy Briefs summarize our key findings and address policymakers at EU and national level. In five minutes reading time, they provide a brief overview and recommendations on three important areas:

A new narrative on Responsible Innovation for the business sector

A Multi-Stakeholder Initiative on Responsible Innovation

Engaging Citizens in Co-Creation processes

Background Papers: Over the last three years, we published ten background papers on different areas of Responsible Innovation. To access and download these so called "Knowledge Units", one has to register as a member of our expert community.

Holographic Telepresence - Technology & Application

Smart Healthy Living, Wellbeing & Prevention

The Internet of Things in the future home

Responsible Innovation in ISO 56002

Fruitful Dialogues

LIVING INNOVATION organized more than 50 virtual and on-site events over a period of three years with more than 1,000 participants. As most of them were video-recorded, their key findings are at one´s disposal - everywhere and free. Please find a selection of events below. For more, please screen through the news section 

Discussing Responsible Innovation with a Minister and two CEOs

Living in a smart future - homes, health, technology & responsibility

Your innovation, my life - Inclusive Innovation for & with the people

Learning how to put Responsible Innovation into practice

Leadership challenges and technologies in remote working: As the Covid-19 pandemic forced many of us to work from home, new leadership challenges arose and high hopes were put into digital technologies. We organized a series of online dialogues on these aspects:

Balancing work, life and health in remote working post-Covid 

New careers, skills and remote working post-Covid 

Holograms and Virtual Reality in Remote Working 

Trust, Surveillance and AI in Remote Working 

Challenges of Remote Working - Leadership and Technology 

 

 


Monday 31

RRI Tools and LIV_IN joined forces to improve and expand contents of the RRI Toolkit focusing on industry needs

Posted by RRI Tools - Eva Zuazua Schücker on 31 Jan 2022

Thanks to this collaboration we reshaped and enriched those sections of the RRI Tools Platform specifically devoted to industry and business - the introductory landing page for industry and the how-to application guidelines - to make them more useful and attractive for this sector. 

Stakeholder landing pages were designed with the aim to provide a “soft” landing for newcomers, introducing the RRI concept to each stakeholder group. These introductory pages outline what RRI means in simple terms, addressing the main benefits, needs and concerns of each group in their own language. Each tailored page contains a selection of recommended resources and links to the How-to application guidelines. We adapted the landing page for business and industry to the new narrative on responsible innovation developed by LIV_IN. The new design outlines key ideas associated with the concept of responsible innovation and provides a schematic overview of the responsible innovation principles

The How-to application guidelines are meant to provide practical guidance on how to address common challenges faced by industry and corporates when trying to put responsible innovation into practice. Thanks to our collaboration with LIVIN, we were able to develop several new how-to guidelines [How to boost creativity and involve people | How to consider future impacts | The business case for Responsible Innovation | Inclusive innovation] based on work and learnings from the project and to enrich with additional contents some of the already existing ones.

LIV_IN has been very active producing a lot of videos. The project launched a video interview series [the “Responsible Innovation Stories”] featuring great thinkers and inspiring ideas and initiatives from academia, industry, and policy. Around 100 interviews have been shot. And it also has produced 10 high-end videos [the “Responsible Innovation Showcases”]  presenting some of the key learnings of the project. To enrich contents of the landing page for industry and of the how-to guidelines, we developed a new frame showcasing some of these videos.

Our partnership with LIV_IN has also served to expand contents of the RRI Tools resource repository. Many new resources of interest for the industry sector have been uploaded into our resource repository in these last three years.

Resources collected include a variety of tools and methods for different purposes:

  • Technology assessment, risk analysis, foresight, future thinking, ethics, AI ethics, etc
  • Co-creation, co-design, creativity techniques, design thinking, design for all, user-driven innovation, multi- inter- and transdisciplinarity, open innovation, crowdsourcing, citizen science, patient-driven innovation, inclusive innovation, gendered innovation, etc.
  • Sustainable development, circular economy, system innovation, smart specialisation, R&I innovation strategies, R&I governance, tech governance, accountability, etc.

We mainly focused on R&I fields related to the scope of LIV_IN project such as: Health and wellbeing, ICT, Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, etc. But we also tried to compile resources related to other industry related fields such as: food and agriculture, energy transition, urban development, transport and mobility, climate change adaptation and sustainability, etc.

We collected resources developed by a wide variety of organizations and initiatives: International multilateral organizations (such as United Nations, the OECD, the WEF, etc.); Universities and Research Centres; R&I projects; Independent non-for-profit think tanks, charities, and foundations, etc., and tried to cover a wide geographical range, tracing and collecting resources developed in different European countries and the USA, but also in other countries and regions, including the Global South.

If you want to access to whole collection --> follow the link

 

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More about the Living Innovation project

LIV_IN is one of the first industry driven initiatives on Responsible Innovation in Europe. The project brings together 14 partners from all over Europe, including major companies, civil society, and research organizations to explore the diverse business opportunities resulting from Responsible Innovation.

The project activities combined a series of on-site workshops with an active online community participating in a wide variety of online dialogues. Together with citizens the project partners co-created responsible solutions in the area of smart homes and smart health and co-developed innovation tools that can be applied in other business sectors as well. 

The participation of "la Caixa" Foundation in the project guaranteed the link and efficient transfer of learnings between LIV_IN and RRI Tools.

After more than three years of hard work LIV_IN officialy ended last November, but the project´s interactive platform will remain up and running, and a series of online innovation corners, around topics such as co-creation, responsible design thinking, extended reality in teaching and more, will be organized in the coming months. Stay tuned!


Wednesday 22

OECD's virtual conference on Technology in and for Society: Innovating well for inclusive transitions

Posted by RRI Tools - Eva Zuazua Schücker on 22 Dec 2021

A couple of weeks ago - on 6-7 December, 2021 - took place an international (virtual) conference on Technology in and for Society, organized by the OECD. During these two days, more than 650 participants joined from more than 60 countries around the world. 

The event brought together discussions on the transformative potential of emerging technology with the necessity of good governance. Participants asked "how can we innovate both more and well, i.e. within inclusive processes, with values at the centre, and with lasting positive impact?" The conference explored the values, design principles, and a possible practical agenda for leveraging good governance for critical sociotechnical transformations. 

An initial set of findings from the conference are set out below and over the coming weeks, the OECD will prepare a conference report to help inform their future work and efforts to meet the urgent needs of policymakers and citizens.

SUMMARY FINDINGS:

The multi-stakeholder OECD conference, “Technology in and for Society,” explored values, design principles, and mechanisms for leveraging good governance for critical sociotechnical transformations. Transforming energy, agrifood, health, and manufacturing systems will require not only major sociotechnical changes but also good technology governance. Conference participants identified important knowledge gaps and policy deficits, including e.g., societal capacities to assess, promote, steer and cope with longer-term sociotechnical change in an inclusive way.

The conference identified avenues for realising more just and effective technological transitions, for example:

  • enriching societal deliberation on the values, purposes and agendas of science and technology;
  • finding mechanisms for feeding the results of those deliberations into science and technology policy;
  • interdisciplinary research and engineering that promotes diversity and integrates values;
  • rethinking foresight and technology assessment to be more goal-oriented and inclusive;
  • expanding the tech governance toolkit to include upstream elements like “ethics by design” and soft law.

The conference examined these and other elements in three technological contexts: neurotechnology; carbon management technologies like carbon capture storage and utilisation (CCUS); and vaccine development. For all three areas, responsible innovation will require greater attention to governance, inclusive and multi-stakeholder processes and cross-sector cooperation, and alignment with goals articulated by society. 

At the end of the conference, some speakers called on the OECD for the development of further policy ideas to harness technology for good and the formulation of common principles to make sure innovation takes place within inclusive processes, with values at the centre, and with lasting positive impact.

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Did you miss the conference? You can now re-watch any of the sessions on the conference website.


Thursday 10

Join the SeeRRI Final Conference | Bringing RRI into Regional Planning

Posted by The SeeRRI team on 10 Jun 2021

The SeeRRI project has worked tirelessly for three years to find a framework that allows territories to put Responsible Research and Innovation principles at the core of their smart specialisation stratregy. Financed by Horizon2020, the project has piloted its process in three different territories: B30 (Spain), Lower Austria, and Nordland (Norway), and has counted on the participation of twelve partner organisations from five different countries. 

As it is now coming to an end, the SeeRRI project will culminate in the Final Conference “Bringing RRI into Regional Planning: From Theory to SeeRRI”, which will take place in the beautiful modernist building “Casa Convalescència” in Barcelona on the 29th and 30th of September. The Conference will bring together policymakers, regional stakeholders, researchers, members of SeeRRI and related projects, EU officials, citizens interested in the future of Europe, and inspiring guest speakers for two days of knowledge-sharing and lively debates about the future of responsible regional planning and responsible research and innovation (RRI) in Europe and beyond. 

At the conference, participants will learn about the outcomes and lessons from the SeeRRI project, including the tools developed by SeeRRI for responsible regional planning. The tools enable regional policymakers and planners to lend legitimacy to their policies by making sure that stakeholders from all strata of society have a voice in policymaking, right from the earliest stage of policy development. The tools are designed with the flexibility to be applied in a broad range of regional settings.

Joining the Conference will give you the opportunity to:

  • Hear interesting perspectives on sustainability, regional innovation strategies, RRI, and related topics from a range of distinguished guest speakers from the public and private sectors.
  • Interact with representatives from other European territories – besides the SeeRRI pilot territories mentioned above – who will have exhibition stands at the conference and share their views on challenges and strategies related to RRI and regional development.
  • Engage in debates that challenge conventional wisdom on how to be responsible in regional planning.
  • Have a chance to network with professionals from across Europe who have an interest in responsible regional planning and responsible research and innovation.

***Registrations are now openfill in the form and make sure you get your spot ***

Call for Posters

Moreover, the Conference will also give you the unique opportunity of visibilising your own project, as it will be displaying posters from other practices and strategies implemented at a territorial level dealing with RRI. Check out the details, get your submissions ready, and prepare for two days of challenging conventional wisdom on how to be responsible in regional planning. 

Deadline for submissions is 30th June 2021


Friday 14

How to include blind and visually impaired people in innovation

Posted by RRI Tools - Eva Zuazua Schücker on 14 May 2021

(*) Post last updated the 27th of May 2021 - link to the recording of the webinar has been added

 

The LIVING INNOVATION project brings together 14 partners from all over Europe, including major industry leaders, civil society and research organizations to co-develop more responsible, inclusive and sustainable approaches to innovation in the areas of smart homes and smart health. The participation of "la Caixa" Foundation in the project guarantees the link and efficient transfer of learnings between LIV_IN and RRI Tools

LIV_IN has created a virtual community platform and launched different joint actions meant to serve as an interactive space for discussion, knowledge exchange and collaboration, open to experts and practitioners.

In this context Dialogik has launched an online working group on inclusive innovation and is organizing a series of workshops. The fisrt one was focused on co-creation with families. The second one will be taking place on May 25th and will be focused on co-creation with blind and visually impaired people.

Two cases will be presented, the experience by the Siemens Accessibility Competence Center conducting several co-creation workshops with blind and visually impaired people in the context of LIV_IN, and the "Sensory Assistive Technologies for Impaired Persons" project, an initiative by the IIT, which is part of the RRI Tools collection of inspiring practices

How to include blind & visually impaired people in innovation | webinar on May 25th 2021 (16:00 – 17:30 CEST)

(*) Recording of the webinar is now online - see here

Presenting two cases of involving blind and visually impaired people, you can explore how co-creation with experts and citizens works and why inclusive innovation is worth considering

In this webinar you will learn:
  • How to set up & facilitate workshops with blind & visually impaired people
  • Co-Creation & Design Thinking Methods for this target group
  • How to implement future innovation processes & the advantages of this approach

Speakers:

  • Klaus-Peter Wegge is the head of the Siemens Accessibility Competence Center. He has conducted several workshops with blind and visually impaired people in the context of the LIV_IN project. Using exciting innovative methods, he aimed to include blind and people with low vision that are ICT affine to discuss their experiences and assessments openly. Additionally, he addressed the question of how smart applications could help improve public transportation for people with reduced mobility.
  • Anja Grüll is researcher at the Institute for Managing Sustainability (Vienna University of Economics and Business). In the framework of the LIV_IN project, 7 moderation tools for workshops involving blind, visually impaired and sighted people have been developed and tested. Anja Grüll will be presenting these useful resources.
  • Luca Brayda is Founder and CEO at Acoesis. He coordinated the project “Sensory Assistive Technologies for Impaired Persons" [Empowerment of disabled people by non-invasive rehabilitation technologies that enhance the senses] at the Italian Institute of Technology. A great example of “inclusive innovation” – with people affected by sensory disabilities (with a special focus on visual & hearing impairments), where they worked together with technology makers & researchers, policy makers, end user associations, clinical validators, and industrial partners.

Scheduled after the presentations, an open discussion will be facilitated by Rainer Kuhn and Sarah-Kristina Wist from Dialogik.

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(*) Recording of the webinar is now online - see here


Wednesday 05

Co-innovation with and for Society | Riconfigure Final Virtual Event

Posted by Matilde Trevisani - Fondazione Adriano Olivetti on 05 May 2021

(*) Post last updated on June 3rd 2021 - the detailed agenda of the event has been added

CONTEXT

Traditionally the innovation process has been driven by the industry, the public sector and/or research. However, increasingly, it is acknowledged that actors from the sector of civil society may bring valuable knowledge to innovation and it is becoming necessary to include these undervalued actors in order to let innovative solutions flourish.

Models like Open Innovation 2.0, Mode 3 or Quadruple Helix (QH) innovation provide theoretical frames for cross sector collaboration that incorporates civil society. The idea of these inclusive innovation models is the following: by bringing different voices together in new types of collaborations, blind spots are avoided because every actor has specific competences and focus points. Also, it is assumed that with an active co-creation process with civil society it is possible
to find more holistic and appropriate solutions.

The RiConfigure project has been dedicated to empirically investigate such actions and to make cross-sectoral collaborations thrive and overcome the challenges that the actors might face.

ABOUT THE EVENT

The RiConfigure final event is an open online event that serve a double purpose. On the one hand, it brings to the public the main results of the project in gaining a more realistic understanding of real-life Quadruple Helix Collaborations (QHCs).  On the other hand, the final event aims to create a space to discuss the roles QH may have in national and EU Research & Innovation landscapes and particularly for the Horizon Europe (HE) Programme.

All participants will be involved in co-creating an agenda on future research directions, policy improvements and actions to be taken to make QHCs progress from a normative concept to a well-established social practice in the context of the forthcoming HE framework.

This final event follows an itinerary articulated in three working sessions:

  1. The first session will engage participants in the discussion of what we have learned from the Riconfigure project;
  2. The second one will focus on what we still don’t know about cross-sectoral collaborations through the dialogue with the participants;
  3. The third one will be dedicated to the co-creation of the agenda to support collaborative innovation within the Horizon Europe programme.

In the week after the final event (Thursday, June 17th) there will be also the possibility to participate in a half day innovation training program on QHCs developed and tested within the Riconfigure project.

You can download a detailed agenda for the final event from here

This virtual event is organized through the online platform 'Zoom'. Participants may take part the whole itinerary of the three sessions, or, join the discussions on a specific day only. The platform will be designed easy-accessible so no specific technical skills are needed to join the event.

WHAT TO EXPECT

  • Discuss with other practitioners, researchers and policy makers
  • Explore and learn from real life collaborations and main results of the Riconfigure project
  • Join a community of knowledge and practice engaged in multi-actor collaborations for sustainable innovation
  • Jointly lay ground for an agenda on future research directions, policy improvements and actions to be taken to make QHC progress
  • Experience tools & methods for involving civil society in cross-sectoral collaboration innovation through the training program

INFO

  • Date: 8, 9, 15 June 2021
  • Time: Three afternoon sessions from 3:00 to 5:00 pm CET time.
  • Where: Online platform accessible via PC and Smartphone (Zoom) - invitation link will follow
  • Who: Persons involved in innovation practice and policy
  • Organizer: EU project RiConfigure | Fondazione Adriano Olivetti in collaboration with Danish Board of Technologies (DBT), Institute for Advanced Studies (IHS) and Wageningen University.
  • Registration form (please when registering specify if you are also interested in participating to the training course on June 17 afternoon from 2:00 to 6:00)
  • Fore more info & contact: riconfigure@fondazioneadrianolivetti.it 


Friday 30

Are we ready for a new era? Public Health and Responsible Innovation in a post-Covid Europe

Posted by RRI Tools - Eva Zuazua Schücker on 30 Apr 2021

(*) Post last updated the 27th of May 2021 - link to the recording of the webinar has been added

 

The LIVING INNOVATION project brings together 14 partners from all over Europe, including major industry leaders, civil society and research organizations to co-develop more responsible, inclusive and sustainable approaches to innovation in the areas of smart homes and smart health. The participation of "la Caixa" Foundation in the project guarantees the link and efficient transfer of learnings between LIV_IN and RRI Tools

LIV_IN has created a virtual community platform and launched different joint actions meant to serve as an interactive space for discussion, knowledge exchange and collaboration, open to experts and practitioners.

In this context De Monfort University & "la Caixa" Foundation have joined forces to organize an online dialogue to explore the future of Public Health and Responsible Innovation in a post-Covid Europe - that will be taking place on May 20th (14.00-17.20 CEST)

(*) Recording of the webinar is now online - see here

As Covid-19 will remain a part of our lives for the next years, the role of public and preventative health has been rarely so important. Digital tools and technologies offer great opportunities to the healthcare sector. However, the challenges and risks in this aspect have to be considered critically.
 
The webinar will focus on:

  • the challenges and dilemmas for Responsible Innovation in the public health sector;
  • bringing together community and commercial perspectives;
  • helping to chart a responsible and sustainable way forward for innovation in public health.

Join the event and:

  • Learn about recent developments for Responsible Innovation and how these fit with goals for CSR, ESG, circularity, the UN SDGs and European policy agendas;
  • Engage, through your questions, in the dialogue between leading experts; and
  • Help your organisation when designing and developing health-related products, providing or procuring technologies and services in a responsible and sustainable way.

You can register to the event here

Workshop Agenda
Session 1 – Different perspectives on Public Health

Facilitated by Malcolm Fisk, Professor of Ageing and Digital Health at
De Montfort University
14:00 Welcome and Introduction to Session 1
14:10


 
Health in All Policies: People, Business and Innovation – Lessons from Utrecht
Matthijs Zwier, Strategic Partner at Municipality of Utrecht and advisory board member at European Health Futures Forum

 
14:25


 
The World of 5G and Digital Health: Getting Innovation Right
Eman Martin-Vignerte, Head of Political Affairs and Government Relations at Bosch UK
14:40 – 15:10
Facilitated debate
 
Session 2 – The Developing Picture on Public Health

Facilitated by Lydia Montandon, Business Development Manager at ATOS Research and Innovation and Eva Zuazua Schucker, Head of Contents & Communication at RRI Tools project
15:25 Welcome Back and Introduction to Session 2
15:30


 
Healthy Environments & Societies:
Why the UN SDGs are Important for Business Ethics

Annette Kleinfeld, Professor of Business Ethics at University of Applied Sciences Konstanz

 
15:40


 
Good Business and the Safeguarding of People’s Health Data
Eerke Boiten, Head of School of Computer Science and Informatics at De Montfort University

 
15:50


 
Promoting Responsibility in Health Innovation:
Funders Perspectives

Ignasi López Verdeguer, Director of the Department of Science and Research at la Caixa Foundation
16:00 – 16:15 Facilitated debate
Session 3 – Charting the Way forward for Health Businesses

Facilitated by Malcolm Fisk, Professor of Ageing and Digital Health at De Montfort University
16:30 Welcome Back and Introduction to Session 3
16:35



 
How Co-Creation can Bring Success for Healthcare Businesses
Myriam Martin, Project Manager at TICBiomed, partner in CHERRIES project

 
16:45




 
How Responsibility in Health Innovation is Guided by Standards
Matthias Marzinko, Director International Standards Management (ISM) at Drägerwerk AG and CEN-CLC Advisory Board for Healthcare Standards (ABHS)

 
16:55


 
Measuring Responsibility: Responding to the New Agenda - Why Healthy and Sustainable Businesses make sense
Natalia Jozwowicz, Manager (Operations, Talent & Culture, Facilities) at Sustainalytics Poland
17:05 – 17:20 Facilitated debate

(*) Recording of the webinar is now online - see here


Monday 19

How to co-create innovations with low-income families

Posted by Eva Zuazua Schücker - RRI Tools on 19 Apr 2021

(*) Post last updated the 13th of May 2021 - link to the recording of the webinar has been added

 

The LIVING INNOVATION project brings together 14 partners from all over Europe, including major industry leaders, civil society and research organizations to co-develop more responsible, inclusive and sustainable approaches to innovation in the areas of smart homes and smart health. The participation of "la Caixa" Foundation in the project guarantees the link and efficient transfer of learnings between LIV_IN and RRI Tools

LIV_IN has created a virtual community platform and launched different joint actions meant to serve as an interactive space for discussion, knowledge exchange and collaboration, open to experts and practitioners.

In this context Dialogik has launched an online working group on inclusive innovation and is organizing a series of workshops. The first one will be taking place on April 28th and will be focused on co-creation with families. Two cases will be presented, an experience by De Monfort University with families from Leicester co-creating future home technologies in the context of LIV_IN, and the PULSE exhibition, an initiative by the Experimentarium science center, which is part of the RRI Tools collection of inspiring practices.

How to co-create innovations with low-income families | webinar on April 28th 2021 (15:00 – 16:30 CEST)

(*) Recording of the webinar is now online - see here

Presenting two cases of involving families from various backgrounds, you can explore how co-creation with experts and citizens works and why inclusive innovation with families is worth considering.

In this workshop, you will learn:

  • How to reach families - even in times of lockdowns
  • How future innovation processes can be implemented with families
  • Co-creation and design thinking methods for co-creation with families

Speakers:

  • Sheena Laursen is Programme Manager at the Experimentarium science center in Hellerup, Denmark. Sheena will talk about the PULSE exhibition. The aim of PULSE was to create an innovative research-based science exhibition and community activities that motivate and support families to take action to develop and sustain healthy lifestyles. The PULSE exhibition also served as an international model demonstrating how science centres can involve socio-economically less advantaged families (as well as more privileged families) in co-creating user-driven health changes/exhibitions.

Scheduled after the presentations, an open discussion will be facilitated by Rainer Kuhn and Sarah-Kristina Wist from Dialogik.

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The recording of the webinar is now online - see here


Thursday 18

Collecting evidence of the (positive) effect of applying Responsible Innovation approaches when developing smart eHealth and healthy living/ wellbeing solutions.

Posted by RRI Tools - Eva Zuazua Schücker on 18 Mar 2021

(*) Post last updated the 13th of May 2021 - link to the recording of the workshop has been added

The LIVING INNOVATION project brings together 14 partners from all over Europe, including major industry leaders, civil society and research organizations to co-develop more responsible, inclusive and sustainable approaches to innovation in the areas of smart homes and smart health.

The participation of "la Caixa" Foundation in the LIV_IN project guarantees the link and the continuous and efficient transfer of learnings between LIV_IN and RRI Tools. The work developed under the umbrella of LIV_IN is serving to enrich and improve contents of the RRI Toolkit focusing on industry needs, and to give higher visibility to LIV_IN and its activities among the R&I community.

LIV_IN has created a virtual community platform and launched different joint actions meant to serve as an interactive space for discussion, knowledge exchange and collaboration, open to experts and practitioners in digitization and responsibility.

In this context Atos & "la Caixa" Foundation have joined forces to identify and collect good practice applying Responsible Innovation (RI) methods and practices to support the design and creation of smart eHealth solutions, and are now organizing a workshop that will take place on March 30th (16.00-17.30 CEST)

(*) Recording of the workshop is now online - see here

The main objective of the workshop is to share experiences and learn about successful examples of smart technologies used to support eHealth, healthy living, and preventive health, and to collect evidence of the (positive) effect of applying Responsible Innovation methodologies. 

Seven use case champions have been invited to talk about their projects and to exchange information about their approach to Responsible Innovation and the benefits they obtained. After the presentations an open discussion among the use cases champions will be facilitated by Lydia Montandon and Diana Carbonero, from Atos.

USE CASES participating:

AIMENTIA  (Virtual clinic powered by Artificial Intelligence for the new era of Mental Health)

- will be presented by Edgar Jorba (Founder & CEO at Aimentia) 

Mental Health is an invisible pandemic that is often ignored, and with COVID-19 it just got worse. Most of the people suffering from a mental health illness receive no treatment. Half of the ones who do, receive a wrong diagnosis. This leads to a lot of patient abandonment. Aimentia Health develops new methodologies to improve the efficiency and success rate of current therapies through a unique cloud-based virtual clinic aimed at helping mental health professionals and patients. The aim is to redefine the standardization of mental health practices, using data-driven tools in order to aid diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making providing diagnostic suggestions, metrics, objectiveness, and data-based solutions. These tools help to reduce the loss of information between sessions, provide diagnostic suggestions and improve decision making capability of the professionals. Traditional tools have been digitized and improved by integrating AI. Treatment is individualized and personalized considering the aggregation of anonymous data to increase its therapeutic efficacy. It reduces the time necessary for diagnoses, it can obtain the same results as the standards with half the necessary inputs. All customizable to adapt it to the comfort of the patient and professional. Aimentia works based on the clustering of symptoms or data, not on disorder labels. This is how the pioneering transdiagnostic model is defined. 

Inrobics  (Intelligent Robotics)

- will be presented by Fernando Fernández Rebollo (Co-Founder & Chief Scientific Officer)

Inrobics proposes a new rehabilitation solution through a digital health AI platform embodied in social robots to help people with functional or neurological limitations improve their quality of life. Designed by health professionals within the paediatric and geriatric contexts, Inrobics is a cloud-based platform that can be used both in rehabilitation centres and in the patient's own home, following a personalized treatment prescribed by his/her regular therapist. The increased frequency of sessions results in a better progress of the treatment. The algorithms acquire knowledge of the patient, allowing to perform fully customized sessions to the patient’s physical and cognitive condition. Sessions include a wide variety of entertainment content and game mechanisms improving the concentration, motivation, and long-term engagement of the patient. 

KAMLEON (Democratizing Health Innovation)

- will be presented by Jordi Ferré Albiol (Co-Founder & CEO)

  

Kamleon is a science-based early-stage company, born with the purpose of democratizing health monitoring by decentralizing traditional laboratory analysis. For doing so they are turning quotidian objects such as toilets, diapers, or patches into effortlessly, non-invasive, real time biomonitoring platforms. Their smart urinalysis system allows to effortlessly monitor advanced physiological metrics, such as hydration, in real time in a robust and non-invasive way. The company is now launching its first pilot project – Road to Tokyo 2021 – at the National French Olympic Training Center. In preparation for the 2024 Paris Olympic Games, the Training Center is undergoing an innovative renovation of its sports facilities, which will be equipped with the latest technological solutions for the tracking of athletes’ performance. Kamleon’s products will make part of the renovation project, and their urinalysis system integrated within the urinals will give athletes the necessary personalized recommendations for optimal nutrition and hydration, aid their recovery process, and ultimately contribute to optimizing their performances.

MELTIC (Ideas Melting pot for TIC and Health science for Citizens in small communities)

- will be presented by Victoria Ramos González (Project leader, Telemedicine and Digital Health Research Unit at ISCIII)
 
The project aims to improve the quality of life of citizens in small communities by co-creating and developing ICT health services with stakeholders including local residents. MELTIC connects with diverse European policy challenges such as depopulation, health, active aging, education, youth, and climate change, and seeks to identify current and future needs of citizens. The objective is to generate, through co‐creation methodologies, suitable ideas for research in ICT in Health and Biomedicine, in topics such as self‐learning, false information discrimination and addiction prevention (compulsive gambling, gaming, and betting). The leading issue is how to use smart technologies to transform public spaces in small communities into people-friendly humane environments. The project will generate a Vade mecum of 100 ideas for research in ICT in Health and Biomedicine and a model for cooperation in small communities in rural areas

The Kaunas Cities Health pilot on urbanism & health

- will be presented by Sandra Andrusaityte (project researcher, Vytautas Magnus University) 
 
The Kaunas pilot study is part of the CitieS-Health project. The research model builds on Participatory Action Research, and is being conducted through collaboration between community members, community-based organizations, public health agencies, and educational institutions with the aim of outlining the citizens’ concerns and placing them at the centre of environmental epidemiology research by developing a kit that engages the citizens and presents evidence on how the urban design and physical activity affect citizens’ health and well-being, and provides them with personalised information. Data is being collected to estimate the link between city environment and citizens health, for data collection non-invasive techniques are being used such as questionnaires, portable sensors, and remote monitoring

EVALAPPS 

- will be presented by Carme Carrion (project leader, UOC eHealth Center) 
  
One of the strategies currently used to mitigate weight-related problems is to use mobile apps. However, it is important to distinguish between those that may be useful and those others that are not effective or may even be harmful. The aim of the EVALAPPS project is the design and validation of a tool to assess the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of mHealth apps whose main goal is to manage and prevent overweight and obesity. The ultimate goal is to provide health professionals and users with the necessary knowledge to know which apps have proven effectiveness and are considered to be valid. As things stand at present, professionals cannot make any recommendations with confidence, because there are no specific regulations for this type of app.

VReal (Virtual Neurological Telerehabilitation) 

- will be presented by Ezequiel Hidalgo Galache (Eyegress SL, Founder and CEO)
 
VReal is an affordable telerehabilitation platform that helps patients with neurological deficits, such as those caused by a stroke, to regain their independence. Using the patient’s smartphone, the platform provides evidence-based, cost-effective neurological telerehabilitation through a range of 360-degree virtual reality videos. VReal combines three different treatments: Mirror Therapy, Action Observation, and Motor Imagery, which were traditionally used separately; patients benefit from the synergistic effect of this approach. VReal is a unified, multidimensional, affordable, efficient business-to-consumer (B2C) platform. Thanks to Google Cardboard, implantation costs have been eliminated. Moreover, therapies were designed from the ground up, which means they do not require direct supervision from a specialist. This translates to a revolution in terms of the therapy itself (the patient decides where, when and how).

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(*) Recording of the workshop is now online - see here

 


Wednesday 17

RiConfigure Training Programmes to promote collaborative innovations

Posted by Luisa Fernanda Barbosa & Frederik Langkjær, RiConfigure project on 17 Feb 2021

Our courses focus on a novel concept that intends to diversify innovation, the collaboration between the different sectors or helices of society: academia, industry, public sector and civil society. This approach, also known as Quadruple helix collaborations (QHC), helps address complex issues, which are a common base in many innovation processes. But it also poses great challenges. Building on experience and knowledge, our courses identify a set of aspects that facilitate or hinder such collaborations and provide tools, methodologies and strategic guidelines that support the design, implementation and evaluation of quadruple helix collaborations for innovation

For two years, the practical experience of the European project RiConfigure on collaborative innovation has been closely followed and structured to create a set of training materials. This experience comes from social experiments, comparative analysis and dialogue events with innovation practitioners and policy makers. With the valuable learnings from the project, the University Pompeu Fabra (UPF, Spain) and Ludwig Boltzmann Gesellschaft (LBG, Austria) have designed and developed three training programmes. 

The courses are partially inspired and based on the trainings created by the project “Higher Education Institutions and Responsible Research and Innovation” [HEIRRI] and address actors, managers or representatives from the four sectors of society interested on involved in innovation processes.
 
Building on experience and knowledge, the courses explore a set of aspects that facilitate or hinder collaborative innovations and provide tools, methodologies and strategic guidelines to support the design, implementation and evaluation of quadruple helix collaborations in innovation. Moreover, the courses provide a platform for networking and for creating alliances with people and institutions with a shared interest into a particular societal issue or grand challenge. The content of the programmes differs in depth and perspective, but all three focus on the transversal aspects of QHCs and provide a variety of examples and cases gathered in RiConfigure.

To develop the courses, UPF and LBG used a pedagogical methodology called the 5E’s Instructional model, which represents five sequential stages of a learning cycle: Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend (or Elaborate), and Evaluate. As part of the different stages there are participatory learning approaches, as Inquiry-based and Problem-based methodologies. For instance, in the open online course, the participants adapt and use personal knowledge and experience in the pursuit of solving an innovation problem. In all cases, the courses couple training situations with real-life practical cases to activate the full range of experience, knowledge and capacities.

During the following months, the RiConfigure project will be organizing the courses in different contexts. Due to the COVID19 pandemic, all three courses will occur online.

Moreover, in May 2021, the courses and all the training materials will be openly available for further use or modification in the websites of RRI Tools, the Studies Centre on Science, Communication and Society and RiConfigure.

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CALENDAR OF THE COURSES:

  • Open online course:

Starting on February 22nd 
By AvanCiencia (Colombia)
(*) A certificate of participation will be given upon completion of the course. 

  • Online workshop:

February 24th, 9h00 – 16h00 (CET)
By Danish Board of Technology (Denmark)
Focus on collaborative innovations

March 18th, 15h00 – 19h00 (CET)
By Institute for Advanced Studies (Austria)
Focus on sustainable mobility

March 23rd, 13h00 – 17h00 (CET)
By Ludwig Boltzmann Gesellschaft (Austria)
Focus on the future of cities and regions

  • Intensive online course:

March 16, 18, 23 and 25th, 15h00 – 17h30 (CET) 
By University Pompeu Fabra (Spain)
Focus on sustainable urbanism
(*) A certificate of participation will be given upon completion of the course.

 

(*) For more information please contact us at info@riconfigure.eu or visit our website.


Monday 14

The initiative #RRIinHE has launched a webinar series to foster the integration of RRI perspectives at the different levels of Horizon Europe

Posted by RRI Tools - Eva Zuazua Schücker on 14 Dec 2020

Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) refers to an approach rolled out in the EU Framework programmes 7 (FP7) and 8 (Horizon 2020) emphasising the on-going process of aligning research and innovation to societal values, needs and expectations. Funders in countries like the UK, Norway and the Netherlands have similar definitions.

RRI guides researchers and research conducting and funding organisations in anticipating the implications of their work, including relevant stakeholders upstream, and reflecting and responding to those stakeholders’ concerns and expectations. In this way, co-design and co-responsibility for the outcomes research and innovation can be facilitated, increasing societal uptake and acceptability of research and innovation.

Experiences from the concluded and ongoing RRI projects can inform the operationalisation of RRI in Horizon Europe as well as in other funding programmes that support inclusive research and innovation processes aligned with societal needs and values. The last decade of the RRI agenda also provides important resources for operationalizing the Open Science agenda in its broad sense, beyond Open Access and Open Data, and the co-creation and citizen science agendas.

The initiative “RRI in Horizon Europe” [#RRIinHE]

While the future of RRI in Horizon Europe is still rather uncertain, it is not as bleak as it appeared in 2019. Several advocates in the ERA have called for higher visibility of RRI in Horizon Europe. Moreover, the Orientations towards the first Strategic Plan for Horizon Europe keeps the door open for RRI and even indicates a ’home’ for RRI in Horizon Europe (in Reforming and Enhancing the European R&I system). However, there is still a need to continue to reinforce the importance of RRI and to help show how it can be implemented widely in Horizon Europe.

This is why a group of RRI scholars and practitioners have joined forces to launch the initiative "RRI in Horizon Europe" with the aim of supporting the visibility and operationalisation of RRI in Horizon Europe. The core group consists of Ellen-Marie Forsberg, Alexander Gerber & Siri Granum Carson. The initiative has received funding and support from the Research Council of Norway to work for strengthening RRI in Horizon Europe and is collaborating with a number of RRI practitioners and scholars.

In February 2020 the group published a position paper on "Including RRI in the development and implementation of Horizon Europe" which was shared widely among the RRI community and sent to relevant shadow committee representatives for Horizon Europe, as well as other stakeholders interested in supporting the RRI agenda in Horizon Europe. Now they have organized a webinar series on how to include RRI in R&I funding calls and projects.

Webinar Series

Are you a programme officer or a member or a Horizon Mission Board? Are you from an EU National Contact Point or a potential project coordinator? Are you interested in learning more about the status of RRI in Horizon Europe and how to integrate RRI perspectives in programmes or projects?

If the answer is yes, then you might be interested in joining the webinar series launched by the group to mainstream RRI at the different levels of Horizon Europe and the R&I landscape at large

The webinar series serves to share experiences with including RRI perspectives into funding calls, programmes, and projects. For researchers this involves quality criteria for effective integration of RRI perspectives in research and innovation projects. For funders, it involves operationalising RRI as assessment criteria and KPIs in the agenda-setting for the Work Programmes; the definition of calls and guidance for applicants; the review process and grant agreements; monitoring processes and impact evaluation.

Each of the individual webinars is tailored to the research fields addressed. Two events have been held until now, the first took place in June 2020 and was devoted to ”RRI in the Blue Bioeconomy”, and the second on “RRI in materials research and the circular economy” held in November 2020. The next webinar is taking place on Wednesday 16th December 2020 and will focus on “Responsible Innovation & Artificial Intelligence"

Taking responsibility for Responsible Artificial Intelligence - Webinar on Wed 16 Dec 2020 (14.30 – 16.30 CET)

A panel of  key actors in the field of ethics and AI will discuss responsible innovation, development and use of AI in Europe and internationally:  Max Erik Tegmark (MIT), Virginia Dignum (Uni. Umeå), Luc Steels (ICREA), Cecilie Mathiesen (Research Council of Norway) and Walter van de Velde (European Innovation Council). Read more and register here


Wednesday 14

RRI Tools featured as a success experience in the Horizon 2020 EU Green Deal call

Posted by RRI Tools on 14 Oct 2020

European Green Deal Call: €1 billion investment to boost the green and digital transition

The European Commission is launching a €1 billion call for research and innovation projects that respond to the climate crisis and help protect Europe's unique ecosystems and biodiversity. The Horizon 2020-funded European Green Deal Call, which is already open for registration, will spur Europe's recovery from the coronavirus crisis by turning green challenges into innovation opportunities.

This Green Deal Call differs in important aspects from previous Horizon 2020 calls. Given the urgency of the challenges it addresses, it aims for clear, discernible results in the short to medium-term, but with a perspective of long-term change. There are fewer, but more targeted, larger and visible actions, with a focus on rapid scalability, dissemination and uptake.

Mariya Gabriel, Commissioner for Innovation, Research, Culture, Education and Youth said: 

“The €1 billion European Green Deal call is the last and biggest call under Horizon 2020. With innovation at its heart, this investment will accelerate a just and sustainable transition to a climate-neutral Europe by 2050. As we do not want anyone left behind in this systemic transformation, we call for specific actions to engage with citizens in novel ways and improve societal relevance and impact.”

The projects funded under this call are expected to deliver results with tangible benefits in ten areas:

Eight thematic areas reflecting the key work streams of the European Green Deal:

  1. Increasing climate ambition
  2. Clean, affordable and secure energy
  3. Industry for a clean and circular economy
  4. Energy and resource efficient buildings
  5. Sustainable and smart mobility
  6. Farm to fork
  7. Biodiversity and ecosystems
  8. Zero-pollution, toxic-free environments

And two horizontal areas - strengthening knowledge (9) and empowering citizens (10), which offer a longer-term perspective in achieving the transformations set out in the European Green Deal.

Area 10: Empowering citizens for the transition towards a climate neutral, sustainable Europe

The European Green Deal communication stresses that the transition towards sustainability must be just and inclusive, put people first and bring together citizens in all their diversity. This calls for citizen engagement and social innovation in all areas of the European Green Deal. This also requires ambitious cross-cutting actions to engage and empower people and communities and to support behavioural, social and cultural changes wherever this is most needed for a fair and inclusive transition, leaving no-one behind. Such actions must address change at the collective level through participatory processes and experimental research on behavioural, social and cultural change; and at an individual level by empowering citizens as actors of change, including through the co-creation of R&I contents. Activities under this area will be implemented through three different topics addressing both collective level actions (topics LC-GD-10-1-2020 and LC-GD-10-2-2020) as well as individual level actions (topic LC-GD-10-3-2020)

The budget available for area 10 is €45 million. Proposals are invited against the following topic(s):

The RRI Tools platform has been featured in the EU Green Deal call (Area 10. Subtopic LC-GD-10-1-2020) as a success experience to build on, together with other fellow projects such as Scientix, EU-Citizen.Science, TeRRIFICA and more.

The call also includes opportunities for international cooperation in addressing the needs of less-developed nations, particularly in Africa, in the context of the Paris Agreement as well as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The deadline for submissions is 26 January 2021, with selected projects expected to start in autumn 2021.

For more information:


Thursday 21

Virtual Dialogue Days | Democratizing Innovation - Fostering collaboration among the public sector, industry, academia & civil society

Posted by Frederik Langkjær & Matilde Trevisani, RiConfigure project on 21 May 2020

 

Context

Quadruple Helix (QH) innovation, the collaboration of actors from public sector, industry, academia and civil society, is a
concept to address complex problems and to innovate for the benefits of all involved. By emphasizing collaboration
across sectors and the active involvement of civil society, QH links to models such as Open Innovation 2.0 and Mode3. The EU project RiConfigure has engaged with a number of QH cases across Europe and Colombia and established first-hand knowledge how these work in practice. The current COVID-19 crisis creates new challenges for society while, at the same time, 'old' problems, such as the climate crisis, are not disappearing. Most of the ways addressing wicked problems are currently top-down and expert based. We thus aim to foster collaborative- and more democratic modes of innovation.

About the dialogue days

The RiConfigure 'dialogue days' are an open online process that brings together policy makers, practitioners and researchers working on and with QH innovation. Knowledge and experience of participants from innovation policy and praxis are linked with findings from an empirical analysis of European and Colombian cases of Quadruple Helix collaborations. The analyzed cases are innovation projects located in fields such as energy production, climate change adaption, connected mobility and smart labor. Together we will discuss what it needs for these type of innovation projects to thrive - particularly in these challenging times. Special emphasis will be given to learnings from COVID-19 challenges to innovation collaborations, both as impacts on and potential of innovation in corona times.

This virtual event is organized through the online platform 'Slack' that allows participants to join discussions whenever they are available. There will be a main channel where, along the dialogue days, videos and other input, stemming from the analysis of RiConfigure, will be uploaded. Sub-channels allow specific discussions as well as the co-creation of output e.g., policy briefs or best practice collection. In each channel, a moderator will stimulate discussions and summarize key learnings. Participants may thus contribute to the whole five-day process, or, join the discussions on selective days/times. The platform will be designed easy-accessible so no specific technical skills are needed to join and contribute. 

What to expect

  • Explore and learn from good practice examples for collaborative innovation 
  • Discuss tools & methods for involving civil society in innovation
  • Connect and develop new ideas of practitioners and policy makers
  • Jointly lay ground for a policy brief, an innovation training program and practice-oriented handbooks for collaborative innovation targeted for practitioners and policy makers

Information

  • Date: 06th -10th July 2020
  • Time: Flexible options to contribute 24h/day across the five days | 1,5h live discussions at each day
  • Who: Persons involved in innovation practice and policy
  • Organizer: EU project RiConfigure | Institute for Advanced Studies (Austria) & Fondazione Adriano Olivetti (Italy) 
  • Contact: geyer@ihs.ac.at | please register via E-Mail until June 26th 2020 

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*A detailed agenda for the dialogue days will be available soon.


Thursday 19

RRI Tools & LIV_IN have joined forces to improve and expand contents of the RRI Toolkit

Posted by Eva Zuazua Schücker - RRI Tools on 19 Mar 2020

The LIVING INNOVATION project brings together 14 partners from all over Europe, including major industry leaders, civil society and research organizations to co-develop more responsible, inclusive and sustainable approaches to innovation in the ICT sector. The project is building capacity and instruments to support the integration of responsible innovation in industrial contexts. The ultimate goal is to shift attitudes towards responsible innovation from risk to opportunity, across sectors and target groups.

LIV_IN is organizing co-creation workshops with lead users and citizens, who are jointly working on solutions that meet user needs and leverage collective creativity to tackle societal challenges, in the areas of smart homes and smart health, and that may uncover new business opportunities. The project has also created a virtual community platform meant to serve as an interactive space for discussion, knowledge exchange and collaboration, open to experts and practitioners in digitization and responsibility.

RRI Tools and LIV_IN have joined forces to enrich and improve contents of the RRI Toolkit focusing on industry needs, and to give higher visibility to LIV_IN and its activities among the R&I community.

Thanks to this collaboration we are adapting those sections of the RRI Tools Platform specifically devoted to industry and business to make them more useful and attractive for this sector, and are developing new how-to application guidelines, based in key learnings from the LIV_IN project. These guidelines are meant to provide practical guidance on how to address common challenges faced by industry and corporates when trying to put responsible innovation into practice. We will be presenting some of these improvements and new developments in the coming weeks and months --> Stay tuned!!

Our partnership with LIV_IN has also served to expand contents of the RRI Toolkit. Many new resources of interest for the industry sector have been uploaded into our resource database in these last months.

Resources collected include a variety of tools and methods for different purposes: 

  • Technology assessment, risk analysis, foresight, future thinking, ethics, AI ethics, etc
  • Co-creation, co-design, creativity techniques, design thinking, design for all, user-driven innovation, , multi- and transdisciplinarity, open innovation, crowdsourcing, citizen science, patient-driven innovation, inclusive innovation, gendered innovation, etc.
  • Sustainable development, circular economy, smart specialisation, R&I innovation strategies, R&I governance, tech governance, accountability, etc.

We mainly focused on R&I fields related to the scope of LIV_IN project such as: Health and wellbeing, ICT, Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, etc. But at the same time, we also tried to compile resources related to other industry related fields such as: food and agriculture, energy, urban development, transport and mobility, etc.

Resources come in a wide range of formats: reports, books, opinion pieces, academic articles, videos, presentations, guidelines, case studies, dedicated portals, catalogues, certification standards, training materials, games, communication tools, etc.

If you want to access to whole collection --> follow the link


Wednesday 26

Including RRI in the development and implementation of Horizon Europe

Posted by E.-M. Forsberg, A. Gerber and S. G. Carson on 26 Feb 2020

** This post was last updated in March 9th **

The Coronavirus disease occured in a serious number of cases in Italy. The Italian government has ordered the closing of schools and universities as well as the cancellation of all cultural events and conferences until 3 April 2020. The Fit4RRI project decided to postpone its Final Summit, until 29-30 April 2020 (if possible), either in presence or virtually. The RRI Forethinkers workshop has therefore also been postponed and the promoters will decide their nexts steps in the coming days

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Now is a crucial time for joining forces to strengthen the visibility of RRI in Horizon Europe! 

We therefore invite key RRI proponents, from key European RRI projects, and a range of ERA member states, to meet for a workshop (Rome, 20-21 March 2020) where the aim is to agree on, and coordinate, actions intended to help advance RRI in Horizon Europe. The workshop is organised with support from the Research Council of Norway and in collaboration with the European New HoRRIzon project, and with the kind support of the Fit4RRI organisers and the Sapienza Università di Roma which has offered to host the workshop at their premises, in connection with the Fit4RRI Summit. You can download the invitation to the workshop and the draft agenda from here (*)

Hereby we are sharing a position paper we intend to send to relevant shadow committee representatives for Horizon Europe, as well as other stakeholders that might be important for supporting the RRI agenda in Horizon Europe. Feel free to reuse parts of the document (or the whole!) for your own lobbying purposes.

 

POSITION PAPER 

Including RRI in the development and implementation of Horizon Europe 

E.-M. Forsberg, A. Gerber and S. G. Carson (February 2020)

 

Why RRI in Horizon Europe?
 
The European Union has an ambition to be a global leader in sustainable and value-driven research and innovation. The European Union, including the upcoming framework programme Horizon Europe, builds upon the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals and has committed to the European Green Deal, where ‘the full range of instruments available under the Horizon Europe programme will support the research and innovation efforts needed’. It is stated that ‘Conventional approaches will not be sufficient. Emphasising experimentation, and working across sectors and disciplines, the EU’s research and innovation agenda will take the systemic approach needed to achieve the aims of the Green Deal. The Horizon Europe programme will also involve local communities in working towards a more sustainable future, in initiatives that seek to combine societal pull and technology push’. Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) is an approach that can support this agenda. 
 
RRI refers to an approach rolled out in Framework Programmes 7 & 8 emphasising the on-going process of aligning research and innovation to societal values, needs and expectations . RRI guides researchers/innovators and research/innovation conducting and funding organisations in anticipating the implications of their work, including citizens and stakeholders upstream, and reflecting and responding on society’s values and concerns. In this way, co-design and co-responsibility for the outcomes of the research and innovation can be facilitated, increasing societal uptake and acceptability of research and innovation. The last decade of the RRI agenda also provides important resources for operationalizing the Open Science agenda in its broad sense, beyond Open Access and Open Data, and the co-creation and citizen science agendas. Experiences from the concluded and ongoing RRI projects (in total 1971 were tagged as RRI projects by January 2019) should thus inform research and innovation investments as they will be outlined in the first Strategic Plan for Horizon Europe, including the sub-chapters on more specific actions.
 
RRI can 
  • make research and innovation more societally legitimate, when it is developed in line with societal values
  • help research and innovation be an instrument for meeting the sustainability goals
  • in this way ensure broader societal support for research and innovation investments that are necessary to keep Europe as a competitive region globally 
Making RRI more visible in Horizon Europe – practical measures
 
RRI is included in Horizon Europe as operational objective 2 (c) (article 2 of the Specific programme implementing Horizon Europe: promoting responsible research and innovation, taking into account the precautionary principles. Recital 26 of the regulation for Horizon Europe states: ‘With the aim of deepening the relationship between science and society and maximising benefits of their interactions, the Programme should actively and systematically engage and involve citizens and civil society organisations in co-designing and co-creating responsible research and innovation agendas and contents, promoting science education, making scientific knowledge publicly accessible, and facilitating participation by citizens and civil society organisations in its activities. It should do so across the Programme and through dedicated activities in the part 'Strengthening the European Research Area'. The document Orientations towards the first Strategic Plan for Horizon Europe also gives a mandate for RRI: ‘Engaging and involving citizens, civil society organisations and end-users in co-design and co-creation processes and promoting responsible research and innovation will improve trust between science and society, and the uptake of scientific evidence-based public policies and innovative solutions.’ These mandates must be followed up with concrete actions, in essence; RRI should be specifically outlined as a requirement of research and innovation in each programme line of Horizon Europe and should be funded as a research and innovation action on its own terms in Reforming and Enhancing the European R&I system.
 
This means:
  • Drafting committees of each programme line should at an early point consider what RRI measures are appropriate for their respective programmes. The level of integration of RRI aspects should be proportional to the potential societal implications of the research and innovation funded in the lines. RRI should be included as assessment criteria and KPIs in (i) the agenda-setting for the Work Programmes; (ii) the definition of calls and guidance for applicants; (iii) the review process and grant agreements; (iv) the monitoring processes and (v) impact evaluation.
  • Budgets must be devoted to RRI actions in projects funded under each programme line. 
  • In this work, the drafting committees should consider seeking the support of RRI experts, who can (before a European network is formed) be found among the major Horizon 2020 RRI projects. In the running of Horizon Europe such a support system should be organised as a permanent structure. 
  • It must be clear that citizen science, open science and co-creation are aspects of RRI, but responsibility in research and innovation also includes being anticipatory, inclusive, reflexive and responsive, and includes considerations of ethics, fairness (social, gender, etc.) and sustainability. Open science, citizen science and co-creation agendas should be considered in this broader perspective and reference to RRI should be made.
  • In order to maintain the investment in RRI competence from Horizon 2020, to be used for high quality RRI engagement in Horizon Europe, a dedicated space (with an appropriate budget) for RRI competence building and further research should be allocated to Reforming and Enhancing the European R&I system, together with citizen science and open science. 
  • A hub on RRI should be funded by the EC in order to ensure quality in the mainstreaming of RRI, co-creation, public engagement and citizen science in the whole framework programme. This hub should build on and further cultivate the RRI knowledge base. It should advise, train, consult, assess and provide quality control, and be a resource for those who include RRI related activities in Horizon Europe programmes and projects. It should also provide experts for the assessment of these aspects of research and innovation proposals and project activities, and for relevant committees and boards.
  • There should be RRI NCPs from each Member State, which should guide and assess the operationalisation of RRI in Horizon Europe, to allow for learning processes at programme and project levels. 
These recommendations build on evidence and experiences from previous projects on RRI and public engagement, and on extended dialogues with RRI experts, funders and policy makers. 
 
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You can download a pdf version of the position paper from here
 
 
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(*) The Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) occured in a serious number of cases in Italy. The Italian government has ordered the closing of schools and universities as well as the cancellation of all cultural events and conferences until 3 April 2020. The Fit4RRI project decided to postpone its Final Summit, until 29-30 April 2020 (if possible), either in presence or virtually. The RRI Forethinkers workshop has therefore also been postponed and the promoters will decide their nexts steps in the coming days
 


Monday 02

Update on SwafS & RRI in Horizon Europe, the upcoming EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation

Posted by Ulrich Schoisswohl from FFG, Austria - NewHoRRIzon project on 02 Dec 2019

Post by Ulrich Schoisswohl from FFG - originally published at the NewHoRRIzon´s project news section

A big thank you to everyone who came forward and supported SwafS and RRI in the public consultations on Horizon Europe launched by the European Commission!

We are relieved that our requests for a stronger consideration of SwafS and RRI have made it into the report on the web-based consultations. Considering the fact that there was no mentioning of SwafS and RRI before the public consultations this is indeed a big win!

The following section has been included in the part ‘Widening/European Research Area’ under the heading ‘on citizen science’ as the central feedback from the public consultations:

A significant number of responses stated that high levels of citizen participation in codesign (e.g. agenda setting) and co-creation (e.g. citizen science, user-led innovation) are required to meet the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals. They stressed that research and innovation must take into account the needs, values and expectations of citizens, in line with Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) and seek to go beyond technological solutions to those that encompass social, economic and governance issues. These responses called for high levels of inclusion of society in research and innovation, specific actions to improve science education (e.g. working closely with schools and other educational establishments), the joint involvement in actions of researchers, businesses, policy makers and citizens (“quadruple helix”) to arrive at solutions that are adapted to societal needs, and interactive and innovative approaches to communicating and deliberating about innovation and science. Finally, these responses reminded that there is a large body of knowledge and existing networks that have developed from the Science and Society (FP6), Science in Society (FP7) and Science with and for Society (Horizon 2020) programmes, which should be leveraged and valorised to help ensure Horizon Europe’s success.

Source: Co-design towards the first strategic plan for Horizon Europe. A report on the web-based consultation and on the European Research and Innovation Days. Page 37

In addition to that there now seems to be an awareness that the wording with respect to gender issues is crucial when it comes to the integration of gender into research and innovation: there is now a more pronounced differentiation between ‘gender equality’ and ‘the gender dimension’ (See page 36 & 37 in the report)

You can find the full report here.


Thursday 17

Challenges for the further development & implementation of responsible innovation - some highlights:

Posted by Dr. Rene von Schomberg on 17 Oct 2019

On the occasion of the launch of the International Handbook on Responsible Innovation, a series of international events are taking place to discuss the challenges ahead of us for the further development and implementation of responsible innovation.

Three debates have taken place until now in Leiden, London and Brussels. The next one will be the 27th November in Manchester.

In this post you will find the agenda’s for the events in Leiden and London and the highlights of these discussions

CHALLENGES FOR RESPONSIBLE INNOVATION

12 September 2019 - Leiden University, Faculty of Social and Bahavioural Sciences

Programme:

  • Introduction: Dr. Rene von Schomberg
  • Panel discussion on Challenges for Responsible Innovation
    • Prof. dr. Jeroen van der Hoven,Technical University of Delft
    • Prof. dr. Harro van Lente, Maastricht University
    • Dr. Melanie Peters, Director Rathenau Institute, The Hague, The Netherlands
    • Prof. dr. Jacqueline Broerse, Free University of Amsterdam
    • Prof. dr. Paul Wouters, University of Leiden
    • Prof. dr. Sarah de Rijcke, University of Leiden
    • Dr. Vincent Blok, Wageningen University

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CHALLENGES FOR RESPONSIBLE INNOVATION

19 September 2019, 18:00-20:00- University College London

Programme:

  • Introduction: Dr. René von Schomberg
  • Discussion with audience and panel: 
    • Dr.Stevienna de Saille, Sheffield University
    • Prof. Andrew Stirling, Sussex University
    • Prof. Bernd Carsten Stahl, De Montfort University
    • Dr. Jack Stilgoe, UCL London
    • Dr. Melanie Smallman, UCL London
    • Prof Marina Jirotka, Oxford

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Highlights of the discussion:

The following summary presents a series of bullet points based upon notes taken at the first two meetings held in Leiden (NL) and London UCL (UK). Both events opened with an introduction from Rene von Schomberg followed by panel member presentations and an open session of questions and points from the floor.

The points have been gathered under broad headings, but many are overlapping and broader in content than the titles here used, which are merely intended as a guide and were determined by the authors of this report and not the participants in the event.

The points were collectively gathered by Lucien von Schomberg, Rene von Schomberg and Jonathan Hankins.

The Direction of Movement

  • RI represents a  new  paradigm  for  innovation,  that  is  both  radically  critical  of  and  goes beyond  previous  (mainstream)  paradigmsof  market-innovation.  It facilitates  publicly funded research and innovation to primarily serve public goods, and requires institutional change including a transformation of the current research system that is shown to be too competitive, costly, and simply unproductivein terms of delivering on socially desirable objectives.
  • RI  should  avoid  being  too  challenge  orientated.  This may  leadto  empty  promises  and expectations, shallow understandings of science and society, and a possible ignoranceof the uncertainty underlying the innovation process.
  • Instead of introducing new concepts and implementationstrategies, RI should question how we are going to change the very agents of changeitself.
  • Current political leaders are using the tools of democracy to destroy democracy. One of the biggest challenges for RI is how to advance through means of deliberative democracy in such a context,that is accompanied by adecline in international cooperation and the governance of emerging technology.
  • RI  still needs to  employ  a  more  holistic  view  on  innovation  that  includes  alternative approachto our economy (e.g.circular economy), and other forms of innovation such as social innovation.
  • RI  should  build  on the normative  conditions that  might  help  to  bringabout  the kind  of political mobilization it requires.

Research and Methodology Related Issues

  • RI  should  not  merely  create  its  own  research  line, but  become a core element in  other researchprograms. 
  • RI  should  focus on  all  research  activities,  from  frontier  research  to  applied  or  societal challenge and mission-oriented research.
  • RI faces the difficulty of addressing the problem of scale, in that some innovation presents problems  because  of  its  scale.  We  can  find  many  examples  of  technologies  that  have become  problematic  due  to  their  mass  uptake  that  might  have  been  very  difficult  to foresee(Facebook for example).
  • How  can  an  RI  approach function  within  a  system whose  measurements of success  are based on GDP?

Interdisciplinarity and Broadening Involvement

  • RI  should  be  careful  not  to  impose  an  open  science  system  that  ends  up  being  just  as instrumentalas previous systems. Instead, it needs to brings us to a fundamentallyopen (i.e.   pluriform   and   diverse)  science  system   through   creating open infrastructures, enabling communities, inspiring researchers, and transforming academia.
  • RI should enable different actors to engage with RRI practices by having it reflected in the educational system.
  • There are many different levels of doing RI (i.e. at the individual level, company/university level,  and  at  the  national/international  level).  A  challenge  for  RI  is  to  connect  these different levels.
  • A big  challenge  for  RI  is  to  make  stakeholders  understand  that  they  all  have  different trainings  and  backgrounds,  which  in  turn  results  in  different  ways  of  thinking  about innovation.

Topics related to Power and Politics

  • RI should contribute to rethinking the power relations that shape our policies, keeping in mind  that  science,  research,  and  innovation should  primarily  resonate  in  the  societal context.
  • RI  should  articulate  a  political  dimension  of  innovation  that  successfully  provides industries with an incentive to engage in RI practices.
  • RI  should  introduce  a  new  politics  of  deliberation  by  creating  spaces  where  innovators and societalactorscan interact and converse in light of what could be seen as a new social contract between science and society.
  • There is the need for more democracy in innovation.
  • While RI has an enormous revolutionary potential, it may also end up in a conventional context of managing innovation. The uncertainty surrounding RI on this point raises the question of to what extend it will be able to go beyond the conventional context.

Businesses and their Engagement

  • RI  should  not  be seen  as too  imposed,  especially  not bycompanies  that  are  actually already engaging in RI practices without per se calling it as such. On the contrary, the RI community should engage with these companies and play a major role in collaborating with them.
  • One  of  the  biggest  challenges fo rRI  remains  the  tension  between  RI approaches and maximizing economic profit. There is  demand for a concrete examplethat demonstrateshow investing in RI would be economically successful.
  • RI  should  articulate  practical  guidance  for  companies  on  how  to  practice  RI  (such  as current successful examples in  practice,  codes  for  conduct,  certification  schemes and standard settingapproaches).
  • Whereas universities and Scientists have ethics committees and other forums where they can raise issues related to RI,businesses do notbut may require them.

Language

  • The term RI is often perceived by scientists as a criticism to what they are doing. One of the  challenges  of  RI  lies  in  how  to  successfully  engage  themwhich  requires  positive uptake of the concept and terminology.
  • RI  should  use  a  language  that  is  less  complex,  thereby  enabling  the  inclusion  of  actors outside of RI circles. 
  • How can RI speak to the younger generation that is looking for solutions to climate change from a personal perspectiveand who are currently mobilizing on a huge scale?
  • RI requires scientists and technologists to engage in a language that is not their own and that they have not been  trained in, presenting a hurdle to uptake and shared understanding


Friday 12

The teaching of research integrity in Europe - state of the art & ways to improve it | Take part in the survey launched by the INTEGRITY project

Posted by Sandra Rossi, INTEGRITY project on 12 Jul 2019

The kickoff meeting of the INTEGRITY project was held last February 2019, in the city of Utrecht. The consortium encompasses 11 European partners from nine countries, and intends to develop strategies and tools that make education for  research integrity more effective

Led by the University of Utrecht, the project’s mission is to build knowledge and develop tools aimed at supporting high school teachers and university professors who are responsible for training related to scientific integrity and research ethics. The educational resources, which the project aims to develop, include a European standard on training for responsible conduct of research, SPOCs (small private online courses), podcasts, educational games, good-practice teaching modules, and a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course).

Under the leadership of the UZH Center of Ethics the project is now mapping the status quo of research integrity training across ten European countries, and conducting a systematic review of empirical findings on research integrity training. Combined with surveys among students (conducted by another partner), these findings will provide the knowledge basis for the developmental activities of the project.

Anyone involved in the teaching of research integrity is kindly invited to participate in the survey. The survey is completely anonymous and it takes 15-20 minutes to complete it. The survey will be active until the 28th July 2019 & is accessible at the following links:

 

 

 


Friday 14

Pathways towards a more inclusive Nanotechnology development in Europe – > Findings from NANO2ALL

Posted by Dora Fazecas, NANO2ALL project on 14 Jun 2019

In the past months, the NANO2ALL team has elaborated a roadmap document which conveys findings from the different NANO2ALL activities, principally from its participatory national and European dialogues and its case studies on past and current societal engagement practices in nanotechnology R&I. The roadmap addresses primarily EU and national decision-makers in the science and technology field with competence in the domain of nanotechnology research and innovation (R&I). It outlines the challenges and opportunities for the development of nanotechnology in Europe within the framework of Responsible Research & Innovation (RRI). The roadmap highlights the conditions that have to be in place for enhanced inclusiveness (societal engagement) across the nanotechnology R&I value chains, and outlines recommended actions to help fulfil these conditions. 

You can download the roadmap from here.

 
KEY FINDINGS FROM THE ROADMAP
 
  • There is a deeply-felt need for inclusiveness (societal engagement) and integration of societal perspectives in the nanotechnology R&I ecosystem 
  • Societal engagement approaches implemented over the past 15 – 20 years in Europe have not reached a full array of societal actors from different European contexts and often did not establish continuous interactions or trust-building between societal actors
  • There is a need to extrapolate lessons learned from these initiatives to inform the future inclusive processes in nano- and other emerging technologies 
  • The proven role of independent intermediaries (for instance science centres, professional moderators, science communicators) in the facilitation of interactions on responsible nanotechnology development should be reinforced.
  • The inclusion of societal representatives and their views should be enabled at certain stages of decision-making. 
  • Some expert feedback suggests that interactions should be established for tackling diverse topics and these are not always “nano-specific”. 
  • Several conditions have to be in place simultaneously (presented below), in order to truly enhance societal engagement across nanotechnology R&I value chains. 

CONDITION 1: FRAMEWORKS FOR SYSTEMISED SOCIETAL ENGAGEMENT IN NANOTECHNOLOGY R&I

RECOMMENDED TRAJECTORIES AND ACTIONS
 
Trajectory 01: Evaluate past societal engagement activities in research and innovation in nanotechnology.
  • Commission an evaluation study of SE in nano in the past years
  • Use knowledge from such an evaluation to elaborate a plan for the promotion of SE in nano and in other emerging technologies
Trajectory 02: Adapt existing frameworks (or create new ones where not existing) to increase the involvement of all actors, incl. citizens and their representatives in R&I decision-making at all stages.
  • Mandate and finance selected EU level and national platforms 
  • Adapt current public consultations for setting R&I priorities using challenge-led forms of SE
  • Adapt existing EU, national and regional research and innovation funding programmes to foster societal engagement in actual nanotechnology R&I processes 
  • Set up advisory services to support the implementation of societal engagement in nanotechnology R&I 

CONDITION 2: LIFELONG PARTICIPATORY CULTURE IN SCIENCE AND SOCIETY MATTERS

RECOMMENDED TRAJECTORIES AND ACTIONS

Trajectory 01: Promote capacity-building and reflections on nano- and other new and emerging technologies via the formal education system.
  • Implement funding programmes for open nano collaborative projects bringing schools in contact with universities and other stakeholders 
  • Promote the uptake of nano- and other emerging technology related teaching materials 
  • Provide a fast track framework for interaction between teachers and researchers through existing platforms

Trajectory 02: Promote scientific culture and critical thinking on nano- and other new and emerging technologies among citizens via lifelong learning and science communication.

  • Fund (incl. through a dedicated strand for science and society matters in Horizon Europe) informal lifelong learning programmes & interdisciplinary funding schemes supporting citizen-science projects embedded into a unique standardised procedure 
  • Develop a clear set of criteria (performance indicators and guidelines) on the quality of science communication activities 

CONDITION 3: OPEN RESEARCH AND INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM TOWARDS SOCIETAL PERSPECTIVES

RECOMMENDED TRAJECTORIES AND ACTIONS
 
Trajectory 01: Foster RRI awareness and competence within the nanotechnology R&I community and incentivise the adoption of RRI by relevant institutions at regional, national and EU levels.
  • Develop a long-term plan for the promotion of awareness-raising and capacity building to members of the R&I community with regard to RRI principles and practices (training programmes coupled with structural changes to the education system aligning academic programmes with RRI goals). Innovation ecosystems (EIT, EIC, etc) should act as multipliers to foster engagement and provide evidence of the benefits of RRI.
  • Induce structural and institutional changes within research organisations, including the adaptation of the evaluation frameworks of these entities and researchers to RRI goals.
  • Develop and continuously update EU and national level measures in order to incentivise the implementation of RRI. Build on existing frameworks eg. CSR) and set up reward schemes, RRI check-list, encourage bottom-up and organic RRI practices.


Wednesday 29

Join the LIV_IN Virtual Summit & help us co-create the way we will live in 2030

Posted by LIV_IN Project on 29 May 2019

Digitalization, Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence hold the potential to improve citizens' daily lives and to create new business opportunities, while helping to address some of the the grand challenges the world is facing today. The Virtual Summit on Responsible Innovation for Smart Homes and Smart Health (June 11-12, 2019)  will explore how this immense potential can be navigated in a responsible, inclusive and sustainable manner. 

Through this post we want to provide you with some more info about some of the speakers and topics that will be discussed at the Virtual Summit

Can European values shape the global race for innovation?

The European Union's fundamental values include human dignity & rights, freedom, democracy, equality & the rule of law. Can these European values shape the global race for innovation? And how can Europe provide the conditions for world-class innovations that are successful in the market & contribute to solving societal challenges at the same time?

  • Compare policy & industry perspectives on technology leadership, European values & responsible innovation.
  • Explore citizen expectations toward policy makers & innovative companies.
  • Share your views on the role of European values for building our digital future.

Will Artificial Intelligence be your friend, your tool or your boss?

Leadership in AI is key to competitiveness. At the same time societal trust is at risk. Therefore companies feel the
need to prevent unintentional damage and misuse. Ethical AI ensures that the technology considers values, human
rights and transparency.

  • Learn where AI is already implemented and how it will affect your daily life.
  • Gain insights the risks and opportunities of AI in smart health and smart homes
  • Explore and discuss ethical guidelines and principles for responsible AI.

How much health data are you willing to share? 

Health data is sensitive data. While health data exchange between organizations is hotly debated, we privately collect
and share health data through wearable devices. Pooling and using such data might help to develop innovative
treatments and preventive care.

  • Explore the potential of data driven preventive health care.
  • Compare European and US perspectives on health data, privacy and responsibility.
  • Discuss what needs to be done to mitigate risks and prevent misuse.

What will your home look like in 2030?

Our homes are becoming smarter and more connected. Individual technologies and integrated smart home solutions increasingly reshape the way we organize our daily life at home. When designed responsibly smart home solutions may enable greater convenience, accessibility and sustainability, while remaining affordable.

  • Learn how smart home technologies fit within a circular economy.
  • Gain insights into trends, applications and implications of smart home solutions.
  • Explore how smart home innovations can enable autonomous living for people with disabilities.

Responsible start-ups: Value for money or money for values? 

Startups are at the forefront of innovation in Europe. Venture capital and access to finance are critical in the initial phases of business development. But are responsible innovation and sustainable business models rewarded by investors? And how can innovation support organizations promote responsibility in startups?

  • Learn how business angels and innovation support organizations foster responsible startups.
  • Explore success factors and barriers to responsible innovation in startups & SMEs.
  • Discuss the potential of startups and investors for driving responsible innovation.

What is the business case for responsible innovation? 

Responsible innovation promises a lot. Better ideas, social acceptance, lower risks, solutions that matter for society,
and innovation that contributes to sustainable development. But is there a business case for responsible innovation in times of hyper competition and ever shorter time to market?

  • Assess the added value of implementing responsible innovation in business.
  • Compare open, responsible and sustainability innovation approaches.
  • Explore how to benefit from linking CSR and innovation-management.

Towards a human-centered, collaborative & inclusive future?

Human-centered innovation approaches are increasingly popular among designers and innovators. Particularly in the context of Responsible Innovation a deep understanding of the needs and wishes of people is relevant in order to generate solutions that provide inclusive value. But what is needed to make innovation truly inclusive? How can meaningful participation be implemented in practice?

  • Discover how Design Thinking can be leveraged for Responsible Innovation.
  • Explore ways of including the needs of people such as impaired persons or deprived social groups into responsible ICT solutions.
  • Discuss requirements and best practice for meaningful citizen engagement in innovation.

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Experts from companies of all sizes, researchers and innovators, entrepreneurs and CSR managers, responsible innovation experts and RTD managers, citizens and anyone interested in these topics are invited to join the Virtual Summit. Register now here. You can download the complete programme from here


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