Tuesday 12

Several job opportunities (ethics of technology, technology & social change, science policy, blockchain technology, RRI, political science & international relations)

Posted by RRI Tools on 12 Dec 2017

  • Assistant Professor of Ethics of Technology (Tenure Track) at Delft University

  • Professor in Technology and Social Change at the Department of Thematic Studies of Linkoping University

  • Research Associate for the Eklipse project at the Faculty of Science, University of East Anglia

 

  • Trilateral Research is seeking to engage a Research Analyst in the field of blockchain technology

  • University of Nottingham Synthetic Biology Research Centre (SBRC) is seeking a Senior Research Fellow in Responsible Research and Innovation

  • Full Professorship in Political Science / International Relations at SciencesPo

 

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Friday 01

Several job opportunities (open science | open access | data ethics | digital transformation & governance of human societies)

Posted by RRI Tools on 01 Dec 2017

  • Project Manager for the European OpenAIRE-Advance project at ​Göttingen State and University Library, Germany

  • Interim Programme Manager at the Nuffield Foundation (London, UK)

  • The JRC Center for Advanced Studies is looking for 3 researchers to join the project on “Digital Transformation - Governance of Human Societies” (Ispra, Italy)

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Tuesday 21

3 RRI Job Opportunities

Posted by RRI Tools on 21 Nov 2017

  • University of Nottingham Synthetic Biology Research Centre (SBRC) is seeking a Senior Research Fellow in Responsible Research and Innovation

  • Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences is looking for a Research Associate in Science Communication

  • The European Science Engagement Association (EUSEA) is looking for support in the PERFORM Project

 

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Thursday 02

“Science issues are increasingly pressing civic issues” - interview with Lee Rainie & Cary Funk

Posted by Social Observatory of "la Caixa" on 02 Nov 2017

“Science issues are increasingly pressing civic issues”

Interview with Lee Rainie & Cary Funk from Pew Research Center.- originally published at Social Observatory "la Caixa"

Lee Rainie and Cary Funk are the heads of Internet, Science and Technology research at the Pew Research Center, a fact tank that informs the public about issues, attitudes and trends that are shaping the world. As a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder, it is a nonprofit, nonpartisan and non-advocacy organization, based on values such as independence, objectivity and rigor. Lee Rainie is the Center’s director of internet, science and technology research, and supervises the surveys that examine people’s online activities and the internet’s role in their lives, as well as the intersection of science and society. Cary Funk is an associate director for research, focusing on science.

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Pew Research Center conducts a wealth of research and produces many facts. How do you choose your research topics?

We are constantly looking to see which topics and key questions in society are pressing issues and could benefit from the kind of data and analysis that we can provide. Our mission is to conduct original, primary research that helps inform major policy decisions and cultural conversations. This means that we spend a lot of time trying to discern noteworthy and urgent issues in public discourse and determining which of these conversations might be helped by the kind of sound, timely data and analysis that we provide. However, we do not perform our research for the purpose of taking a position on policy outcomes.

 

Since facts are never completely neutral, do you take any neutrality measures with regard to dissemination?

We work to make sure that our research is balanced and neutral, starting with how we design our questions right through to how we describe our findings. Dissemination of our research focuses on people, groups and organizations who share an interest in the topic under study, regardless of their policy position. So, for instance, we hope our material is equally useful to those who want to limit immigration even more and to those who support more liberal immigration policies, or to those who want to cut science research and those who support higher levels of science research. We know that we are achieving our goals for balanced research when advocates on both sides of an issue cite our studies. For example, we recently observed in an appeals court that the judges on both sides of an immigration argument used our data to support their opinions on the case.

 

Why has the Pew Research Center expanded its research on science and society?

The Center decided to expand its research in these areas for three reasons. First, science issues are increasingly pressing civic issues: significant policy and ethical questions are driven by what scientists discover and how policymakers and the general public react to those discoveries. Second, science and technology innovations are at the heart of societal change: nations look to breakthroughs in nanotechnology, genomics, brain science, energy technologies, food production, robotics and other fields to fuel economic growth. Third, scientific findings are a key battleground for how cultures decide what is true: the rise of the internet and the explosion of communities of interest around science issues have raised fundamental questions about how facts are unearthed and what meaning they should be assigned when crafting policy solutions.

 

What is the relevance of science research in relation to other topics tackled by the Center, such as politics and religion?

As we already said, science issues are more broadly civic issues. Our analysis of public attitudes across 23 science-related issues showed that sometimes people’s political views are a major influence on their positions on a science issue and sometimes their religious beliefs and practices are a notable influence. Other times, people’s general level of education and their specific level of knowledge about science are influences. We find that some judgments about science are increasingly divided along partisan lines, such as support for federal government spending on scientific research, but also that many science subjects are not swept up by partisan hostilities.

The thing we find most fascinating with regard to all of these issues is that there is no single explanation for why people think the way they do about science. For example, people’s political views matter significantly in their thinking about climate change and energy issues, whereas religion is strongly related to how people think about end-of-life medical issues and people’s views about biomedical advances on the horizon

 

In science debates, what carries more weight: political ideology or facts? 

People’s political orientations appear to serve as an anchoring point for how knowledge influences their attitudes. For example, many in the scientific community believe that if the American public were better informed about the science behind climate change and energy issues, people would hold views more closely aligned with those of scientific experts. But as we found in a 2016 Pew Research Center survey on these issues, how much people know about science has only a modest and inconsistent correlation with their attitudes about climate and energy issues, whereas partisanship is a stronger factor in people’s beliefs. People’s level of science knowledge help to explain their beliefs about climate change to a certain degree, but the relationship is a complicated one.

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Wednesday 18

Get to know the RRI Tools ppts - developed to help you disseminate the RRI concept

Posted by RRI Tools on 18 Oct 2017

The RRI Tools project team has developed a series power point presentations (ppts) with the purpose to provide users with communication and advocacy tools for the dissemination of the Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) concept. They were hence created to be used and adapted as convenient to:    

  • Disseminate the concept of RRI.
  • Empower as many actors as possible in following and implementing the RRI principles.
  • Help users find guidance and further information with the RRI Toolkit.

The following ppts are available:

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Thursday 22

Roll the RRI Dice!

Posted by Antonina Khodzhaeva and Andrea Troncoso on 22 Jun 2017

The Ecsite team created for the RRI Tools toolkit a dice that gives the oportunity to provoke conversations, reflections and create scenarios, especially thought for RRI Trainings or RRI meetings. 

 

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Monday 12

First workshop on Exploring the Application of RRI to Innovation Ecosystems EARRI’17

Posted by Francesco Niglia‎ on 12 Jun 2017

We invite empirical and methodological contributions focusing on the adoption of one or more pillars of RRI perspective to contribute to the definition of guidelines for the application of RRI in innovation ecosystems that include citizens and the territory. The adoption of RRI principles can significantly enhance the explanation of dynamic phenomena such as organizational capabilities and routines, strategic behaviour, entrepreneurship, organizational learning, and innovation.

List of topics:

  •  Original Best Practices of application of one or more of RRI pillars (public engagement, science education, ethics, open access, gender) in an Innovation Ecosystem and its communication to the public via courses or events.
  • Methods and examples of research, businesses and organisations (both for-profit and non-profit) creating synergies in new strategies, products, services and concepts that provide answers to ethic and gender issues.
  • Contributions on how the RRI approach affects the development and implementation of policies targeting the dynamics of innovation systems are also welcome.
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Tuesday 30

Conference "Responsible Research and Innovation in the health industry"- key messages from round tables

Posted by RRI Tools on 30 May 2017

 

The way forward: key messages from round tables 

Closing remarks by Ignasi López at the Conference “Responsible Research and Innovation in the Health Industry” held at the EESC premises, in Brussels, on 18 and 19 May 2017.

I would like to thank all speakers and the moderator. This Conference is a joint initiative of the ELSI Board of the EIT Health and the Final Conference of the Responsible Industry project, together with the European Commission, the EESC and the “la Caixa" Foundation, who I do represent.  I would like to thank them all.

 I was asked to wrap up. And it is an honor to do so. 

 1st day: May 18th – some key messages:

  • “No research and innovation about me without me”: there is a bottom up claim from society
  • And a political answer:  the framework of RRI 
    • A number of challenges are ahead
    • In a very complex context

And a headline from EESC: “RRI - or however we call it - seems to be mature enough to embed it in the biggest R&I funding programme in the world: FP9”

In the 1st round table we saw amazing experiences of citizen engagement in different fields of R&I in the health sector: engagement of patients in the editorial process, as end users of innovation, as innovators… Through living labs, maker spaces, citizen science, biolabs, science museums, in industry (big corporates, SMEs and entrepreneurs...)

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Monday 10

Responsible research and innovation in the health industry

Posted by RRI Tools on 10 Apr 2017

Responsible Research and Innovation calls for innovation that integrates societal concerns in all the phases of R&I, from the design of the research agendas to the commercialization of research outcomes. The idea of RRI is that anticipating the social needs and concerns of novel technologies by integrating wider society will facilitate better innovation. 

The European Institute of Innovation and Technology, the European Economic and Social Committee and the EU project Responsible-Industry organize the conference “Responsible Research and Innovation in the Health Industry” to be held at the EESC premises, in Brussels, on 18 and 19 May 2017.

The conference will discuss how RRI can help to boost innovation in biomedicine and health with a special focus on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). It will ask how social values and needs can be “integrated from scratch” and which drivers and obstacles RRI encounters when implemented in companies.

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Tuesday 28

How can early career researchers make their voices heard in public debates? - join us at the "Standing up for Science" workshop

Posted by Kathryn Brian - Sense about Science on 28 Mar 2017

Sense about Science EU is running a workshop for early career researchers exploring the representation of science in the media and policy-making. The ‘Standing up for Science" workshop will involve interactions with experienced researchers who have previously engaged with the media and policymakers, as well as science journalists and policymakers. 

How can early career researchers make their voices heard in public debates?. Sense about Science EU aims to do this by building a network to cultivate in the next generation of European researchers the ethos of taking responsibility for public discussion, and to give them the confidence and the know-how to do it, addressing one of the main RRI aims.

I am the current intern at Sense about Science EU and I have had the pleasure of previously attending a "Standing up for Science" workshop in the UK. I thought I would give you a personal insight into how I viewed the day to give you a flavour of what to expect. 

The day started with.......

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